Insect Allergies


Bee

Hey folks, it’s spring again! Finally, it’s here. The weather starts to warm, the trees blossom. We can finally start to shake off that cold winter. Planting, picnics, and outdoor activities begin to fill our vocabulary again, but along with all the awesomeness of spring, comes insects. While insects are a much needed component for our ecosystem, for some people it can bring dread. If you have been diagnosed with an insect allergy, spring and summer can have a whole new meaning.

The most common insect allergy is an allergic reaction to bee stings. An allergic reaction can range from mild to very severe.

If you have been diagnosed with a bee sting allergy, and your physician has prescribed you an epinephrine auto-injector, it is integral that you carry your epinephrine auto-injector with you at all times never leaving home without it. Unfortunately, these stings can happen when we least expect it and we need to be always prepared. They can easily be carried with a RescueShotCase epinephrine auto-injector carrying case. These cases are great, and can be clipped either to a belt or attached to a strap or briefcase. They also come in a host of cool colors and are available for both Epipen® and Auvi-Q® epinephrine auto-injectors

For kids with insect allergies, their schools and camps, should be made aware of the insect allergy and given a proper protocol to follow, which can include proper training on how to use and administer an emergency epinephrine auto-injector like the Epipen® or Auvi-Q®. Be safe and enjoy the spring!

For more info on RescueShotCase carrying case for Epipen® or Auvi-Q® you can find us at www.rescueshotcase.com

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